Hadrian's Wall Northumberland
Hadrian's Wall Northumberland
England Scotland Tyne-and-Wear Durham Cumbria Alnwick Hexham Newcastle
Northumberland is one of England’s two border counties, the other being Cumbria. It is situated in the north-east of England, and in addition to its borders with Cumbria and Scotland, Northumberland also shares borders with County Durham and Tyne and Wear. It is a county of many contrasts, and one with a complicated, turbulent and often violent history. From ferocious conflicts on contested territory between the English and the Scots to rebellion and uprisings against the government and from the civilisation and fortification of the Roman Empire’s northern frontiers to proud traditions of coalmining, shipbuilding and fishing, Northumberland is packed with historical intrigue. The county was also at the forefront during the Industrial Revolution, while the works of Northumbrian monks kept Christianity alive in the British Isles through the Dark Ages.

Northumberland is also a county with a diverse landscape. Northumberland National Park was created in 1956, and encompasses 400 square miles of spectacular moorland, woodland and desolate fells. The majestic Cheviot Hills make challenging walking country, while the North Pennines are an area of outstanding natural beauty, and considered to be England’s last remaining wilderness. Northumberland also boasts more than 80 miles of coastline, including the superb Northumberland Heritage Coast, stretching 40 miles from Amble to Berwick-upon-Tweed and varying from stark craggy cliffs to beautiful golden sandy beaches and rolling sand dunes.

Further, Northumberland boasts the picturesque splendour of Coquetdale and the beautiful Tynedale region, as well as Kielder - Europe’s largest man-made lake and forest. If all this wonderful scenery is not enough, Northumberland also boasts more castles than any other part of the UK, as well as the UNESCO world heritage site of Hadrian’s Wall and the mystical beauty of Lindisfarne – Holy Island. The region is rich in wildlife, being one of the few remaining habitats of the Red Squirrel, and the Farne Islands are home to England’s largest colony of grey seals, puffins and other remarkable species. Remote the region may be, but Northumberland offers a wealth of scenery and attractions that make the visit worthwhile. With some one million visitors to the county every year, there is something to interest everyone in Northumberland.